putthison:

Bad News, Beards
From The Guardian:

Hirsute men have been warned their attractiveness to potential partners may fade as facial hair becomes more prevalent, in a scenario researchers have called “peak beard”.
Research conducted by the University of NSW finds that, when people are confronted by a succession of bearded men, clean-shaven men become more attractive to them.

Photo: Brian Wilson, musician; beard and novelty t-shirt aficionado.
-Pete (currently bearded)

putthison:

Bad News, Beards

From The Guardian:

Hirsute men have been warned their attractiveness to potential partners may fade as facial hair becomes more prevalent, in a scenario researchers have called “peak beard”.

Research conducted by the University of NSW finds that, when people are confronted by a succession of bearded men, clean-shaven men become more attractive to them.

Photo: Brian Wilson, musician; beard and novelty t-shirt aficionado.

-Pete (currently bearded)

The introduction page to the Our Drive To Mexico companion zine.
—————
Chris and I met in 1998 through friends involved in the underground local music scene in the suburbs surrounding Toronto. Named after the suburban area code, the “905 scene” consisted of all types of underground Punk, Hardcore, Emo, Ska and Indie Rock bands.  While thriving off of the new found connectivity of the internet and revolving mostly around the infamous “905 (message) board” the scene still relied heavily on physical printed media and the DIY ethic. In an age before Facebook, Instagram, Pitchfork and AbsolutePunk, folks involved in the scene relied on making their own printed flyers to promote their shows and photocopied fanzines to voice their opinions, reviews and creativity. Chris and I were chomping at the bit to be apart of a scene where we could share our creativity and worldview with an inclusive community of like minded people.  After a couple of years of attending shows and building relationships in the community we decided to launch our own fanzine, Let’s Drive To Mexico. This was the first physical form of our artistic collaboration but certainly not our last. The zine consisted of album and live show reviews, feature interviews with both bands, photographers and artists as well as a “new band showcase” and basically any editorial columns or art our friends wanted to contribute. We sold advertising space to friends and local entrepreneurs involved in the scene, from aspiring studio engineers and producers, photographers, record labels and graphic designers. The local YMCA played a big part the community at the time and would host most of the all ages shows.  The program director would not only buy ads for the Y’s Career Development program but would graciously allow us to use their photocopier in exchange for us stuffing each zine with a flyer for their upcoming shows. In the short time we published LDTM we were fortunate enough to interview such notable bands as The Promise Ring, Less Than Jake, The Constantines, Dillinger Four, Boys Night Out, The Fullblast and Alexisonfire as well as receive press passes to shows and fistfuls of free albums.  Around the time we were doing the zine, I started photographing every show and generally documenting my day to day life while Chris took up screen printing as a hobby. I fondly remember making the first merchandise for my band Silverstein in Chris’ childhood home with a simple screen printing kit and a hand cut design of a star with an “S” in the middle.  Since then, Chris has pursued a degree and career in printing making and I have traveled the world with the band, seizing every opportunity to document my travels in photos. When Chris finished school he spent a few years on the road with Silverstein selling our merchandise or helping out on stage as a guitar tech. He returned from the road inspired to make art and used many of my photos of our friends and the places we had traveled as some of his first prints. Back in 2010 I hopped in the van with our dear friends band I Am Committing A Sin for a weekend of shows up into Montreal, and we naturally stayed with Chris. We arrived to find his apartment decorated with his early screen prints featuring some of my photos. I took a photo of the wall of four prints, one of our friend Kevin King and late friend Nick Hurlbut playing in their former band Bury Her Breathing, one of Chris kicking his feet up on a long drive, one of a graffiti covered wall behind a venue in West Virginia and a shot of me that Chris took on the 2005 Warped Tour. Seeing these photos as prints inspired me to pitch the idea of a collaborative art exhibit to Chris. We spent the next few years bouncing back ideas and sifting through photos. We knew the project could never fully cover the years and miles we have traveled as friends and artists but we hoped that it would carry the spirit of our individual stories and how we used our two mediums to express a common theme or emotion. The photo I took that day in Montreal had to be the cover, and while we never actually drove there (and this book has nothing to do with the country) this is Our Drive To Mexico.
—————
Copies of the ODTM hand screen printed art book as well as zines, posters and the original photos are all available online » http://ourdrivetomexico.storenvy.com High-res

The introduction page to the Our Drive To Mexico companion zine.

—————

Chris and I met in 1998 through friends involved in the underground local music scene in the suburbs surrounding Toronto. Named after the suburban area code, the “905 scene” consisted of all types of underground Punk, Hardcore, Emo, Ska and Indie Rock bands.  While thriving off of the new found connectivity of the internet and revolving mostly around the infamous “905 (message) board” the scene still relied heavily on physical printed media and the DIY ethic. In an age before Facebook, Instagram, Pitchfork and AbsolutePunk, folks involved in the scene relied on making their own printed flyers to promote their shows and photocopied fanzines to voice their opinions, reviews and creativity. Chris and I were chomping at the bit to be apart of a scene where we could share our creativity and worldview with an inclusive community of like minded people.  

After a couple of years of attending shows and building relationships in the community we decided to launch our own fanzine, Let’s Drive To Mexico. This was the first physical form of our artistic collaboration but certainly not our last. The zine consisted of album and live show reviews, feature interviews with both bands, photographers and artists as well as a “new band showcase” and basically any editorial columns or art our friends wanted to contribute. We sold advertising space to friends and local entrepreneurs involved in the scene, from aspiring studio engineers and producers, photographers, record labels and graphic designers. The local YMCA played a big part the community at the time and would host most of the all ages shows.  The program director would not only buy ads for the Y’s Career Development program but would graciously allow us to use their photocopier in exchange for us stuffing each zine with a flyer for their upcoming shows. In the short time we published LDTM we were fortunate enough to interview such notable bands as The Promise Ring, Less Than Jake, The Constantines, Dillinger Four, Boys Night Out, The Fullblast and Alexisonfire as well as receive press passes to shows and fistfuls of free albums.  

Around the time we were doing the zine, I started photographing every show and generally documenting my day to day life while Chris took up screen printing as a hobby. I fondly remember making the first merchandise for my band Silverstein in Chris’ childhood home with a simple screen printing kit and a hand cut design of a star with an “S” in the middle.  Since then, Chris has pursued a degree and career in printing making and I have traveled the world with the band, seizing every opportunity to document my travels in photos. When Chris finished school he spent a few years on the road with Silverstein selling our merchandise or helping out on stage as a guitar tech. He returned from the road inspired to make art and used many of my photos of our friends and the places we had traveled as some of his first prints. Back in 2010 I hopped in the van with our dear friends band I Am Committing A Sin for a weekend of shows up into Montreal, and we naturally stayed with Chris. We arrived to find his apartment decorated with his early screen prints featuring some of my photos. I took a photo of the wall of four prints, one of our friend Kevin King and late friend Nick Hurlbut playing in their former band Bury Her Breathing, one of Chris kicking his feet up on a long drive, one of a graffiti covered wall behind a venue in West Virginia and a shot of me that Chris took on the 2005 Warped Tour. Seeing these photos as prints inspired me to pitch the idea of a collaborative art exhibit to Chris. We spent the next few years bouncing back ideas and sifting through photos. We knew the project could never fully cover the years and miles we have traveled as friends and artists but we hoped that it would carry the spirit of our individual stories and how we used our two mediums to express a common theme or emotion. The photo I took that day in Montreal had to be the cover, and while we never actually drove there (and this book has nothing to do with the country) this is Our Drive To Mexico.

—————

Copies of the ODTM hand screen printed art book as well as zines, posters and the original photos are all available online » http://ourdrivetomexico.storenvy.com

Save the date! Thursday March 27th will be the opening reception for my gallery with @dabogirl69 at @huntclubstudio So excited! High-res

Save the date! Thursday March 27th will be the opening reception for my gallery with @dabogirl69 at @huntclubstudio So excited!

Coming Soon: my first published art book ‘Our Drive to Mexico’ - a collaboration of my photos screen printed by @dabogirl69 for La Presse Chat Perdu. Limited edition hand printed / assembled books will be available as well as individual prints & photos being showcased at a gallery event in Toronto in the coming months. Very excited to finally share this! High-res

Coming Soon: my first published art book ‘Our Drive to Mexico’ - a collaboration of my photos screen printed by @dabogirl69 for La Presse Chat Perdu. Limited edition hand printed / assembled books will be available as well as individual prints & photos being showcased at a gallery event in Toronto in the coming months. Very excited to finally share this!

brendanklein:

briankeithdiaz:

Twenty years ago today I went to see Nirvana in New York City with David A. Galea, the pre-story to this concert having been documented in a previous post entitled “Milk It”. He showed up to the concert wearing a dress belonging to his then-girlfriend. We pressed ourselves up to the front of the…

Diaz is the man. Also, he is correct about hard work and making it. If this dummy from long island (me not diaz) can land a gig working along side one of his favorite artists then anyone can. I may not make a million bucks, but I love what I do, and to me, that’s way more important. 

Can’t wait to read all his stories, you should pre-order it too. 

reblog of a reblog.

pre-ordered book.

backed hard.

putthison:

Getting a Good Grey Sweatshirt
Every fall season, I can’t seem to stop myself from buying more sweaters, but the one I keep coming back to, year after year, is my reliable grey sweatshirt. For casual use with chinos and jeans, I can’t think of anything better. It’s low-maintenance, sporty, and if the fit is right, can look pretty great.
My favorite sweatshirts are made by Japanese companies such as Buzz Rickson, The Real McCoys, and Strike Gold. These brands specialize in mid-century reproductions, and often use older production techniques (these techniques don’t lend any special advantage, they’re just neat if you care about such things). They’re also thicker and denser than most other sweatshirts on the market. You can find them at them at Self Edge, Blue in Green, Superdenim, and Bench & Loom.
Other really great companies include Archival Clothing, WTAPs, Levis Vintage Clothing, Sunspel, Reigning Champ, Battenwear, Loopwheeler, RRL, and Velva Sheen. Many of these will have their own unique selling points. Archival Clothing, for example, has theirs made in Portland, Oregon by the old-school American manufacturer Columbiaknit, while Levis Vintage Clothing often draws from Levis’ extensive in-house archive. These models tend to be quite expensive, however, so if you want something more affordable, check out Champion, American Giant, Land’s End, Uniqlo, and J. Crew. The last three hold sales pretty often, so you can knock the price down further if you exercise some patience.
Naturally, many people may be wondering what’s the difference between a ~$150 sweatshirt and something that you can find for ~$50. Some of this will be in the detailing, such as some having loopwheeled constructions (which again, are just old ways of making these garments). Some of this will be in the quality of the materials. My Buzz Rickson sweatshirt, for example, is nice and dense, and doesn’t stretch out as easily as the one I bought from J. Crew. It also has a “vintage” fit that I like, which is slightly boxy and short. I think it goes well with the kind of boots, jeans, and jackets I like to wear. 
In the end, however, you just need to find something that fits you well, and works for your budget. Not all sweatshirts have to be dumpy, and not all nice ones have to cost an arm and a leg. If you find that your sweatshirt stretches out easily, just throw it in the wash and put it in the dryer after each wear. It should shrink back to shape. The color might dull from being in the dryer so much, but … it’s a sweatshirt. These look better beat up. 
High-res

putthison:

Getting a Good Grey Sweatshirt

Every fall season, I can’t seem to stop myself from buying more sweaters, but the one I keep coming back to, year after year, is my reliable grey sweatshirt. For casual use with chinos and jeans, I can’t think of anything better. It’s low-maintenance, sporty, and if the fit is right, can look pretty great.

My favorite sweatshirts are made by Japanese companies such as Buzz Rickson, The Real McCoys, and Strike Gold. These brands specialize in mid-century reproductions, and often use older production techniques (these techniques don’t lend any special advantage, they’re just neat if you care about such things). They’re also thicker and denser than most other sweatshirts on the market. You can find them at them at Self Edge, Blue in Green, Superdenim, and Bench & Loom.

Other really great companies include Archival Clothing, WTAPs, Levis Vintage Clothing, Sunspel, Reigning Champ, Battenwear, Loopwheeler, RRL, and Velva Sheen. Many of these will have their own unique selling points. Archival Clothing, for example, has theirs made in Portland, Oregon by the old-school American manufacturer Columbiaknit, while Levis Vintage Clothing often draws from Levis’ extensive in-house archive. These models tend to be quite expensive, however, so if you want something more affordable, check out Champion, American Giant, Land’s EndUniqlo, and J. Crew. The last three hold sales pretty often, so you can knock the price down further if you exercise some patience.

Naturally, many people may be wondering what’s the difference between a ~$150 sweatshirt and something that you can find for ~$50. Some of this will be in the detailing, such as some having loopwheeled constructions (which again, are just old ways of making these garments). Some of this will be in the quality of the materials. My Buzz Rickson sweatshirt, for example, is nice and dense, and doesn’t stretch out as easily as the one I bought from J. Crew. It also has a “vintage” fit that I like, which is slightly boxy and short. I think it goes well with the kind of boots, jeans, and jackets I like to wear. 

In the end, however, you just need to find something that fits you well, and works for your budget. Not all sweatshirts have to be dumpy, and not all nice ones have to cost an arm and a leg. If you find that your sweatshirt stretches out easily, just throw it in the wash and put it in the dryer after each wear. It should shrink back to shape. The color might dull from being in the dryer so much, but … it’s a sweatshirt. These look better beat up.